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Most In-depth Study ( Must Have )

Saturday, November 29, 2008

The Ruy Lopez for White - Moller and Arkhangelsk Variations Part 3

Hello everybody,

In our last post we have studied Black's 2nd reply as a 5th move alternative, Variation B: 5...Bc5 including the sub-variations, Variation B1: 7...d5!? and Variation B2: 7...d6 in the Moller and Arkhangelsk Variations.

Today we will go for Black's 3rd reply as 5th move alternative, Variation C: 5...b5 which will include two sub-variation i.e Variation C1: 6...Bc5 and Variation C2: 6...Bb7. We will study only Variation C1 today which will again include two sub-variation as Black's 8th move alternatives, namely Variation C11: 8...Bb7, Variation C12: 8...Rb8 and Variation C13: 8...Bg4.

So, let's start with Variation C11: 8...Bb7


Let's move on to Variation C12: 8...Rb8


And now, Variation C13: 8...Bg4


Well, it has been a lengthy discussion today. The point was to finish the study of Variation C1: 6...Bc5 in one go to avoid future inconvenience for you as well as for me.

Hope it was not too much to you. In fact, it should not be too much. There is nothing called "too much" in chess.

In the next post we will study Variation C2: 6...Bb7.

Keep visiting and keep reading. There is lot more to come.

Thanks a lot. Enjoy!!



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Monday, November 24, 2008

The Ruy Lopez for White - Moller and Arkhangelsk Variations Part 2

Hello friends,

Let us continue our journey into the Moller and Arkhangelsk Variations without wasting any time. In the last post we have studied Black's first reply, Variation A: 5...d6. Today we will study Black's second reply as a 5th move alternative, Variation B: 5...Bc5. In this Variation we will study Black's two 7th move alternatives as sub-variations i.e Variation B1: 7...d5!? and Variation B2: 7...d6.

Let's start with Variation B1: 7...d5!?


Now we will go for Variation B2: 7...d6


Well, well, well....it seems that White can be a lot better here. Do let me know what do you think about this.

Go through the variations again and again and try to recognize patterns, that's what I can say at this point. It's certainly getting more and more interesting. Isn't it?

Let's leave it here. In our next post we will study another of Black's 5th move alternative which will again contain a few sub-variations.

Till then, stay tuned. We are not over yet!!

Keep visiting and keep reading. Thanks a lot. Enjoy!!



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Sunday, November 23, 2008

The Ruy Lopez for White - Moller and Arkhangelsk Variations Part 1

Hello everybody,
Today we are going to start a new chapter on the Ruy Lopez from White's perspective, the Moller and Arkhangelsk Variations. Lets plunge into it right away:

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4 Nf6 5 0-0





The Arkhangelsk Variation (5...b5 6 Bb3 Bb7) and the Moller Variation (5...Bc5 or 5...b5 6 Bb3 Bc5) represent ambitious plans of development by Black. In particular, the variation 5...b5 6 Bb3 Bc5 has in the last few years become increasingly popular at the highest levels, so much so that it's even threatening to become Black's main reply to the Lopez . The closely related Arkhangelsk went through a similar vogue , although on a slightly smaller scale, in the early 1990s. Both variations can lead to very sharp play. Against these lines, recommended is that White should play c3 and d4, but care is needed with move-orders.

White Plays d4: Black Reacts with ...Bb6




In this theoretical position, if White plays 8 d4 Black reacts with 8...Bb6! , maintaining the pawn on e5 and keeping the pressure on d4. If Black were forced to play 8...exd4 , relinquishing the centre, then his whole strategy would have been at fault. 8...Bb6 works through tactical means, as can be seen in the theory section.

White Attacks with a4

With Black's bishop on c5 and knight on c6 (see diagram), there is no real opportunity for Black to link his pawn-chain with ...c5. This can in fact leave the b5-pawn rather isolated and vulnerable to attack. One of White's weapons in these variations is to attack the pawn with an early a4. This assault can be sustained by moves such as Na3 and Qe2.



White Protects d4 with Be3



In some variations White will try to negate the pressure from the b6-bishop by playing Be3. This protects the d4-pawn and thus allows White to continue to develop smoothly with Nbd2, Often White will play h3, in order to prevent ...Ng4. With the white bishop on e3, Black has to be wary of the possibility of d5, followed by Bxb6, which would leave Black with doubled pawns.
The main lines in these Variations revolves around Black's 5th move alternatives, while the sub-variations will include Black's 6th, 7th and 8th move alternatives. And bear it in mind, dear readers, it will be a pretty lengthy discussion because these variations demands that!

Let's start with Variation A: 5...d6:


Well, what do you think? I like it anyway, and I am ready to play and confront this everytime I play as White!!

We will study Variation B in our next post. Till then, study the position arising out of this reply from Black and make it clear in your head. We have a long way to go!!

Keep visiting and keep reading. 

Thanks a lot. Enjoy!!

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Video Coverage of World Chess Championship 2008

Here is a exclusive video coverage of World Chess Championship 2008. Hope that you all will find them ineresting.Let me know what you think :)




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Wednesday, November 19, 2008

The Ruy Lopez for White - Deferred Steinitz, Norwegian and Delayed Schliemann Part 3

Hello everybody,
We will continue our study of the Deferred Steinitz. In the last post we have reviewed Black's 5th move alternative (Variation C1: 5...f5) in the Deferred Steinitz. Today we will study Variation C2: 5...Bd7. This variation will include two sub-variation based on Black's 6th move alternatives and we will study both of them one by one.
So let's start with Variation C21: 6...Nge7:

Now let's move on to Variation C22: 6...g6:

So, interesting isn't it? 
This concludes our study on Deferred Steinitz, Norwegian and the Delayed Schliemann.
Do tell us how you liked it. Your comments are most valuable to us.
From the next post, we will start another chapter on the Ruy Lopez, the Moller and Arkhangelsk Variations. It will be a pretty long discussion which we will divide into several parts for your convenience. 
So, stay tuned. We will be back shortly.

Until then, bye. 
Keep visiting and keep reading. Thanks a lot. Enjoy!!
Subscribe to Chess Blog | The Pulse of Chess     If you liked the article kindly Digg it, Stumble it, Add to Technorati, bookmark it and please consider subscribing through  "Subscribe by Email"  and have articles & a  Everyman Chessbase eBook delivered right to your inbox! OR "Subscribe to Chess Blog Feed" in a Fead Reader of your choice OR Subscribe to "SMS Alerts" & Get Article Headlines & Updates delivered to your Mobile Phone for free.

Saturday, November 15, 2008

The Ruy Lopez for White - Deferred Steinitz, Norwegian and Delayed Schliemann Part 2

Hello everybody,
We will start today, the Norwegian Variation, Variation B: 4...b5
Now let's move on to Black's next 4th move alternative, The Deferred Steinitz, Variation C: 4...d6. Here, Blacks has two alternatives for the fifth move, of which we will study the first one, Variation C1: 5...f5


So, White can definitely be better under these circumstances.
We will study Variation C2: 5...Bd7 in our next post.
Until then, stay tuned.

Thanks a lot. Enjoy!!
Subscribe to Chess Blog | The Pulse of Chess     If you liked the article kindly Digg it, Stumble it, Add to Technorati, bookmark it and please consider subscribing through  "Subscribe by Email"  and have articles & a  Everyman Chessbase eBook delivered right to your inbox! OR "Subscribe to Chess Blog Feed" in a Fead Reader of your choice OR Subscribe to "SMS Alerts" & Get Article Headlines & Updates delivered to your Mobile Phone for free.

Thursday, November 13, 2008

The Ruy Lopez for White - Deferred Steinitz, Norwegian and Delayed Schliemann Part 1

Hello friends,
We will start a new chapter today which involves Black's attempt to harass White's bishop on b5. Pay attention.
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4
In this chapter we will look at Black's fourth move alternatives to 4...Nf6, including the Delayed Schliemann (4...f5), the Norwegian Variation (4...b5 5 Bb3 Na5) and, most importantly, the Steinitz Defence Deferred (4...d6).
The last of these options is basically an improved version of the Steinitz Defence. One of the reasons for this is that Black is ready at any moment to escape the pin on the a4-e8 diagonal with a timely ...b5. This can be seen to the full effect if White tries to follow the same recipe as against the Steinitz Defence. After 5 d4 b5! 6 Bb3 Nxd4 7 Nxd4 exd4 the natural 8 Qxd4? is a mistake which falls into what's known as the 'Noah's Ark Trap' . After 8...c5! White cannot avoid a loss of material, e.g. 9 Qd5 Be6 10 Qc6+ Bd7 11 Qd5 c4! and the Lopez bishop is cruelly trapped!


White has a few different choices against the Steinitz Deferred, including 5 0-0, 5 c4 and 5 Bxc6+, but I'm recommending the most popular move, 5 c3, which immediately goes about setting up a pawn-centre with d4. Black can then choose to play adventurously with the risky 5...f5, which leads to sharp play reminiscent of the Schliemann Defence. It's more usual, however, for Black to support the e5-pawn, either with ...Nge7-g6, or ...g6 and ...Bg7. Play in these lines is much slower and of a positional nature. Black's position is usually very solid, if slightly cramped.
White Plays d4-d5
In many variations of the Steinitz Deferred, White has the option of maintaining the tension in the centre or pushing with d4-d5 , reaching this type of closed position.
The strategy then become very similar to lines of the King's Indian Defence. White may seek to attack on the queenside by trying to enforce the c4-c5 advance, while Black will play in a similar way on the other side with ...f5. One major difference from the King's Indian is that the light-squared bishops are normally exchanged quite early after d4-d5 . This difference usually favours White, as the pawn-structure dictates that White has swapped off his traditionally 'bad' bishop, while Black no longer has his 'good' bishop.
Now let's start with Variation A: 4...f5 (Delayed Schliemann)
So White can certainly pull out some advantage with his two bishops, whereas Black's bishop is still to be developed from it's original square! Positionally White is far better than Black.
We will study the Norwegian Variation in our next post.
Until then...
...Keep visiting and keep reading.
Thanks a lot. Enjoy!!
Subscribe to Chess Blog | The Pulse of Chess     If you liked the article kindly Digg it, Stumble it, Add to Technorati, bookmark it and please consider subscribing through  "Subscribe by Email"  and have articles & a  Everyman Chessbase eBook delivered right to your inbox! OR "Subscribe to Chess Blog Feed" in a Fead Reader of your choice OR Subscribe to "SMS Alerts" & Get Article Headlines & Updates delivered to your Mobile Phone for free.

Tuesday, November 11, 2008

The Ruy Lopez for White - Berlin Defence Part 4

Hello everybody,
This will be the concluding discussion on the Berlin Defence. Today we will study the remaining two of Black's 9th move alternative, Variation B23: 9...h6 and Variation B24: 9...Ke8. Let's start without wasting any time.
Variation B23: 9...h6
Now let's move on to the next and last possible reply from Black, Variation B24: 9...Ke8

You might find the above variations a little difficult to follow, but my advise to you will be to follow one sub-variation at a time and make the positions clear in your head, and then only proceed for the next one. 
The truth is, this is where The Ruy Lopez gets more and more interesting inspite of the fact that it is actually getting more and more complex.  And believe me, the top grandmasters of the world don't play the Berlin Defence for nothing!!
And this is not the end! From now on every variation in The Ruy Lopez will be the most precious and the most played ones.
To give you a hint, from our next post we will study The Deferred Steinitz and other fourth move alternatives for Black which will include the Norwegian Variation and the Delayed Schliemann other than the Deferred Steinitz.
So friends, you are most welcome to join us in the most detailed and most thorough study of the most widely played openings in chess history.
Keep visiting and keep reading. We are talking about chess here!
Thanks a lot. Enjoy!!
Subscribe to Chess Blog | The Pulse of Chess     If you liked the article kindly Digg it, Stumble it, Add to Technorati, bookmark it and please consider subscribing through  "Subscribe by Email"  and have articles & a  Everyman Chessbase eBook delivered right to your inbox! OR "Subscribe to Chess Blog Feed" in a Fead Reader of your choice OR Subscribe to "SMS Alerts" & Get Article Headlines & Updates delivered to your Mobile Phone for free.

Monday, November 10, 2008

The Ruy Lopez for White - Berlin Defence Part 3

Hello and welcome everybody again to our study of The Ruy Lopez from White's perspective. It has been quite a long time since we had the last episode of our study. In fact, all of you know that there was this big event, World Championship 2008 that kept all of us very very busy in our chess quest. The most busy person from our side was of-course, my friend Chessyman who worked day and night to bring to you the live games and coverages, full with interesting and accurate analysis of each and every game. To tell you the truth, I was tuned to this blog throughout the event, watching and studying the analysis provided by him. And I must tell you that he has done a great great job indeed. Hope all of you enjoyed.
Now, as the event is over, we will be back concentrating on our study of openings. So, here we go...
In our last session, we had studied Black's reply 5...Be7 and had started 5...Nd6, where we studied Black's 7th move alternative Variation B1: 7...Ne4!?
Now we will survey Black's reply, Variation B2: 7...Nf5. The sub-variations of this reply involve Black's 9th move alternatives. So, let's start.

Variation B21: 9...Ne7
Let's study another Black's 9th move alternative, Variation B22: 9...Be6
So White can pull out advantages whatever may the situation be if he/she plays cautiously. And as Berlin Defence is one of the most widely played variations in The Ruy Lopez, you can definitely give it a try!!
In the next post we will conclude the Berlin Defence. 
Keep visiting and keep reading. Your valuable comments are always welcome.

Stay tuned!!
Thanks a lot. Enjoy!!
Subscribe to Chess Blog | The Pulse of Chess     If you liked the article kindly Digg it, Stumble it, Add to Technorati, bookmark it and please consider subscribing through  "Subscribe by Email"  and have articles & a  Everyman Chessbase eBook delivered right to your inbox! OR "Subscribe to Chess Blog Feed" in a Fead Reader of your choice OR Subscribe to "SMS Alerts" & Get Article Headlines & Updates delivered to your Mobile Phone for free.

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